Tag Archives: Lammily

Barbie’s New Body



The news was just released that Barbie is getting a new body to be more realistic for the average girl’s body. And my initial reaction was, “FINALLY, MATTEL GOT THE MESSAGE.”  We know that this concept of realistic body images for girls is a hit and some folks have taken it into their own hands to develop realistic dolls, like the founder of Lammily.

Now, the traditional Barbie isn’t getting replaced, but instead will have shelf sisters who are more diverse than ever. In addition, to the changes Mattel made in 2015 by offering different skin tones, Mattel is taking it a necessary step further by added three new body types to the product line: tall, petite and curvy, which also happen to come with different hair colors to best reflect the ever-changing trends of 21st century America. YASSSS!

Not only does this doll evolution develop young girls’ views on self body image in a healthier way, but it also provides a greater chance for play and imagination to run wild. All too often I found myself as a kid throwing doll parties in Barbie’s dream townhouse (complete with pulley elevator) and I often forgot who was hosting the shindig because Veterinarian Barbie looked like Nurse Barbie or wait, was that Ballerina Barbie? — all Barbies in my play trunk looked the same — bright smile, blonde hair, trim waste, always shoeless — except with the only identifier being her clothing, which I changed regularly. Girls now will have the opportunity to play with dolls that closely reflect what’s currently out in the world allowing them to develop more character personas which lead to creative playtime and ultimately growing their reasoning that yes, we’re all people but what makes us beautiful is our differences.

I’m ecstatic that after years of media and bloggers like myself urging Mattel to make changes by exposing the false realities of Barbie’s biology they finally listened. And the new and improved dolls went on sale today at Barbie.com and I’m interested to see how well they do in terms of sales and outreach to more moms, daughters and other Barbie enthusiasts.


Watch the video from Mattel on why this evolution is important to them — AKA Mattel showcasing that they’ve received our messages loud and clear!



Dear Barbie, Meet Lammily

Dear Barbie, Meet Lammily
We’re all familiar with the unrealistic Barbie biology and the pressures she subconsciously has on young girls growing up.

Hey there, Lammily! image credit: Nicoklay Lamm

Hey there, Lammily! image credit: Nicoklay Lamm

Nickolay Lamm, a full-time artist and researcher sat down a few months ago and designed a “normal” Barbie that reflected the proportions of a 19 year-old girl based on the CDC reported standards. His goal: to show that average is beautiful and to revolutionize how girls think about their body through a new fashion doll named, Lammily. Watch out Barbie there’s a new girl in town and she can bend her knees, elbows, wrists, ankles and isn’t constantly walking on her tippy toes.

After countless requests from parents and girls alike to make this average doll from an illustrator on paper to a physical doll for purchase, Lamm started his kickstarter campaign and as of March 5 has almost $20,000 raised!
Seeing that Barbie was featured as a Sports Illustrated model this year, (seriously) it’s clear Mattel has no interest in changing Babs measurements to be more realistic. However with the demand for change, there has never been more of an opportune time for toys to challenge societal standards. GoldieBlox challenged the pink aisle and restrictive gender stereotypes and so will Lammily.

I already donated $75 and I am looking forward to giving away one first edition Lammily doll right here on the blog! So stay tuned for that nugget of awesome!

I really believe by changing toys, freeing magazine covers of photoshopped images, and casting more female protagonists in television shows and movies we are changing the way girls think and view themselves and others.
Please donate to the Lammily project here: https://www.lammily.com/average-is-beautiful


What are your thoughts on making this average doll a reality for girls everywhere?!